Woodstock Wood.

We aim to supply higher grade quality woods because they are hotter and slower burning than other lower grade woods, resulting in a lower pollution rate.

Well seasoned wood:

Well-seasoned firewood generally has darkened ends, is relatively lightweight, and makes a clear "clunk" when two pieces are knocked together.

The bark usually peels off easily from aged wood.

Freshly cut wood can have a 60% moisture content. Seasoned firewood with a moisture content of less than 25% is easier to start, produces more heat, and burns cleaner.

However, the best way to be sure you have good wood when you need it is to buy your wood early, from a reputable supplier before you intend to burn it, and store it properly.

Seasoned wood will usually not be affected by small amounts of rain. Wet wood throws off less heat when burned, contributes to creosote build-up and pollution.

Pine

Soft Wood, quicker burning, will generally burn faster than hard woods. Good to moderate heat output. Suited to both open fires and log burners. 
As a firewood the older the tree, the better the burning properties especially in trees 30yrs+ which is termed "old man pine".
Trees 30yrs+ can contain a high content of resin/gum which is a flammable product.
Whatever the age, pine is a hot burning wood.

Macrocarpa

Medium firewood, clean burning, with good heat output and reasonably long burning time. It has a tendency to spark, & therefore is not suitable for open fires.

Gum

Hardwood, slow burning, maximum heat output, clean burning. Suited to both open fires  and log burners. Can be difficult to start a fire with.

Eucalyptus

A fast burning wood with a pleasant smell and no spitting. It is full of sap and oils when fresh and can start a chimney fire if burned unseasoned. The stringy wood fiber may be hard to split and one option is to slice it into rings and allow to season and self split. The gum from the tree produces a fresh medicinal smell when burned.

Kanuka

The wood is very hard and is particularly popular as firewood, burning with a great heat. In New Zealand, Kanuka can grow up to 30 metres high with a trunk up to one metre across.